When It Comes To Transmissions, ‘Rebuilt’ Is a Term You Should Know

Being that it applies to transmission repair, the term “rebuilt” is term you should become familiar with. Despite the fact that the average transmission has over 300 parts, replacing only a few internal parts can label a transmission as “rebuilt”. In the state of Texas, the terms “rebuilt”, “overhauled” or “reconditioned” may be used if the number of parts replaced is equal to two or more. Be sure to ask if the parts are new, reconditioned or used and what exactly is being replaced for the quoted price.

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Go Green!

Looking for ways to become more environmentally friendly with your car? Motorists can help protect the environment by following four simple steps from the non-profit Car Care Council.

  1. Follow a vehicle service schedule including steps like checking engine performance, keeping tires properly inflated, replacing air filters regularly, changing oil regularly and checking your gas cap. Routine maintenance helps reduce emissions and fuel consumption, saving money at the pump.
  1. Keep your current vehicle longer and limit the number of new cars you buy over the course of a lifetime. Extending vehicle life is as simple as taking care of your vehicle properly. You’ll gain years of reliable service without monthly car payments and higher insurance rates.
  1. Recycle or properly dispose motor oil, tires, batteries, fluids and other vehicle components to help protect the planet when performing vehicle maintenance or repairs.
  1. Repower your engine when faced with serious engine trouble. A remanufactured/rebuilt engine can give your vehicle new life and make it more fuel efficient for about the cost of an average down payment on a new car.

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Did You Know?

Did you know we offer free customer pickup and drop off service within a 40 mile radius? We also offer:

  • Transmission Repair Starting at $485 and Up.
  • $200 Dollars Off Major Repairs
  • 3 Day Free Car Rental with Major Repairs
  • Free Towing on all Major Repairs
  • Free Diagnostics with Major Repair ($250 Value)
  • Multiple Financing Options Available with or without Credit Check
    96% Approval – 0% Up to 6 Months

Choosing a Transmission Specialist

When you choose a transmission specialist, be sure you know exactly what work you are authorizing (i.e. estimate, internal or external diagnosis, or transmission repair).

If asked, the technician should be willing to show you the damaged parts and explain the repair work. Also, ask for a damaged-parts report and a breakdown of the work that was done. If you want to inspect the damaged parts pulled from the transmission, be sure to ask the mechanic when you authorize the work, not after. As with any contract, make sure you understand all aspects of the work. If you give your authorization over the phone, understand exactly what work you are approving. Phone authorization is a binding commitment.

What To Look For

  • Is the shop a member of the Better Business Bureau? The Bureau can give you the company’s history in dealing with customers?
  • Is the company a member of any transmission groups, such as the Automatic Transmission Rebuilder Association (ATRA) or Automatic Service Association (ASA), or is it part of a national franchise that offers
    training programs to keep technicians up-to-date on new technology?
  • Do they participate in continuing education and training programs?
  • Is the shop well-equipped with the proper diagnostic tools for your vehicle? One of the easiest things to look for is the hydraulic lifts needed to raise your car?
  • Is the shop clean and professional looking? Does it appear to be well-run?

Police Stops: What to Do If You Are Pulled Over

When You See the Police Car

If a police car is following you with its siren blaring or emergency lights flashing, pull over to the right quickly (but safely) and come to a complete stop in a safe place. Police Stop

Pulling over right away isn’t an admission of guilt. It just means that you were alert to everything that was happening around you. Also, by stopping as soon as you can, you’ll have a better chance of figuring out exactly where and how the officer says you violated any traffic laws. This information can be useful should you and a lawyer later need to prepare a defense.

Pull over in a way that will be most likely to calm down an angry or annoyed traffic officer. Use your turn signal to indicate any lane changes from left to right, and slow down fairly quickly, but not so quickly that the officer will have to brake to avoid hitting you. Pull over as far to the right as possible, so that the officer won’t have to worry about being clipped by vehicles in the right lane when coming up to your window.

Right After You Stop

After you’ve pulled over to a safe spot, you should normally turn off your engine. At this point, you might want to show the officer a few other token courtesies. You have little to lose and perhaps something to gain.

Roll down your window all the way. Put out a cigarette if you have one and discard any chewing gum (within the car). You might also want to place your hands on the steering wheel, and, if it’s dark, turn on your interior light. These actions will tend to allay any fears the officer might have. After all, police officers have been killed in traffic-stop situations, and the officer’s approach to the vehicle is potentially the most dangerous moment.

Your dignity might be offended a little at this point, but remember that you’re just doing a few simple things to put the officer in an optimal frame of mind.

Also, stay in the car until and unless the officer directs you to get out. Finally, don’t start rummaging through your back pocket for your wallet and license, or in your glove compartment for your registration, until the officer asks you for them. For all the officer  knows, you could be reaching for a weapon.

Excuses to Search

A police officer who stops you for a traffic violation is normally not allowed to search your vehicle. But there are several exceptions to this general rule.

After pulling you over, an officer will watch for any sort of “furtive movement.” A sudden lowering of one or both shoulders, for example, will tip the officer off that you’re attempting to hide something under the seat.

An officer enforcing a traffic stop isn’t looking just for furtive movements. Officers will look for anything incriminating that’s in “plain view” (like open beer or wine bottles, joints, or roach clips). Discovery of one item in plain view often leads to a thorough search that reveals more incriminating or illegal objects.

If you’re arrested and your car is towed, the police may generally make an “inventory search” afterward, even if they have no reason to suspect there’s anything illegal inside

Five-star safety

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For example, five stars do not always add up to six or more airbags. Some car makers provide only enough (four) airbags to earn the five-star rating.

For complete peace of mind, be sure to check there are two front, two side (usually in the outer cushion of the front seats) and two head-protecting “curtain” airbags that drop down from the roof above the side windows – front and rear.

Some cars have knee-protecting airbags under the steering column and near the glovebox, while others also have rear-seat airbags.